Cookie-Richtlinien

Sep 072018
 

Ort: Limmattal, Aargau Jobtyp: Temporär Publikationsdatum: Montag, 27. August*8 Referenznummer: ***81 Stellenbeschreibung Arbeiten Sie gerne in einem internationalen Umfeld? Für unseren Kunden, ein internationa…
Randstad

Klicken Sie hier für weitere Informationen und zu bewerben

 Posted by at 4:19 am

Switzerland: Consultant: Impact study of ICVA’s work for 2015 – 2018 strategy and the reporting for 2018

 FULL TIME, Leyes / Abogados, SHIFT  Comments Off on Switzerland: Consultant: Impact study of ICVA’s work for 2015 – 2018 strategy and the reporting for 2018
Aug 312018
 

Organization: International Council of Voluntary Agencies
Country: Switzerland
Closing date: 27 Sep 2018

Organization: ICVA

Location: Geneva (or remotely based)

Start date: November 2018

End date: February 2019

Number of days: 45 working days

ICVA is searching for a consultant to capture the impact of its work in line with its 2015 – 2018 Strategic Plan and for the year 2018.**

Rationale and context for the study

Founded in 1962, ICVA (International Council of Voluntary Agencies) is a global network of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) working collectively to promote and facilitate NGO engagement in the humanitarian sector and the development of its policies.

The premise underpinning ICVA’s core work is guided by the assumption that increased NGO understanding of the humanitarian sector and increased NGO engagement in the development of the humanitarian sector and its policies contributes to more principled, collective and efficient humanitarian action and policies, closing the gap between field realities and global policies.

Based on this approach, and informed by its core mission and its 2015 – 2018 Strategic Plan, ICVA intends to:

  • Identify the current level of NGO understanding of, and engagement in, the humanitarian sector and its policies,

  • Promote NGOs and NGO fora participation in key policy debates, and;

  • Capture ICVA’s and NGO fora influence on humanitarian policies.

This study will act as

  • a review of ICVA’s impact during 2018

  • a review of the end-of-strategy impact of the 2015 – 2018 ICVA strategy

It will inform ICVA’s forward looking planning and reporting, and build on the lessons learned for the new strategy for 2019 – 2021.

Objectives

Overall objective:

  • To identify the impact of ICVA’s efforts in influencing and amplifying NGO perspectives in humanitarian dialogue and policies.

Period covered by the reviews:

  • End-of-year review: January – December 2018

  • End-of-strategy review: January 2015 – December 2018

Audience targeted throughout the review:

Primary: ICVA members, NGOs, NGO Fora & platforms

Secondary: UN agencies, other partners, donors, Member States

Content and methodology of the study

Objective 1:

To capture the level and progression of ICVA members’ and NGOs’ understanding of, and engagement in, the governance of the humanitarian sector and its policies, through ICVA’s work;

This study will capture:

i) The extent to which ICVA’s work assists NGOs to increase their knowledge of the humanitarian sector and its policies;

ii) The extent to which ICVA’s work assists NGOs and NGO fora to increase their engagement in the humanitarian sector and the development of its policies at the global level.

To achieve the above, this study will:

  • Compile ICVA’s initiatives aiming to increase NGO understanding and engagement;

  • Review previous Impact Studies, ICVA’s Annual reports and analyse members’ understanding and engagement in policies at global level;

  • Complete an analysis of internal data of NGO participation and engagement in ICVA activities for the year 2018.

Objective 2:

To illustrate ICVA’s efforts in shaping humanitarian policies and echoing NGOs and NGO fora perspectives.

This study will capture the impact of ICVA’s work on humanitarian dialogue and policy, identifying successes, limitations, and contributing factors to inform ICVA’s forward approach.

To achieve the above, this study will:

  • Compile key initiatives and policies ICVA has engaged in throughout the targeted period;

  • Complete a perception survey (targeting ICVA members, NGOs, UN agencies and key donors) identifying ICVA’s role in shaping humanitarian policies through echoing NGO perspectives.

  • Update the selection of “case studies” of policies ICVA has engaged in during the period of 2015 to 2018. The case studies will detail ICVA’s approach in collecting and echoing NGOs perspectives, and how (and whether) ICVA has been instrumental in shaping those policies. Case studies will be updated based on internal and external reporting and documentation, along with questionnaires/surveys and interviews with ICVA members, NGOs, UN agencies and key donors/member states.

Methodology:

Review and conduct interviews and surveys with:

  • ICVA members;

  • Non-Member NGOs and NGO fora;

  • UN agencies, other partners and donors’ representatives and senior staff.

Literature review of past ICVA Impact studies, annual and donor reports and other external and internal documents.

The review will be undertaken by an independent consultant/company. She/he/they will be guided and supported by ICVA secretariat, under the leadership of ICVA’s Director of Programmes.

Final Outputs

  • An overall 2015 – 2018 strategy impact report composed of the two specific objectives for the end-of-strategy review (in addition to an executive summary, introduction, description of the methodology in English);

  • A end-of 2018 impact report aligned to ICVA’s workplan and log frame for reporting;

  • Presentation package (brief pdf, power point) in English of key findings of:

  • 2015 to 2018 strategy

  • 2018 impact report

  • Package of case studies identifying lessons learned;

  • Guidance or recommendations for ICVA’s future data collection and M&E approach for the new strategy;

  • Briefing on the findings and recommendations of the reviews.

Timing:

November 2018 to February 2019 (45 working days)

Consultant’s requirements:

To conduct this study, the consultant will have the following profile and experience:

  • Extensive knowledge and experience of monitoring and evaluation methodology and reporting;

  • Extensive knowledge of the humanitarian sector and policies;

  • Extensive experience in working/interacting with NGOs and the UN system;

  • Extensive experience in conducting similar studies and surveys;

  • Ability to work quickly and deliver products in line with agreed timeframes, ensuring strong communication with the ICVA team;

  • Excellent English writing skills. **

How to apply:

Application process:

  • Please email recruitment6@icvanetwork.org with a proposal for the above study (including proposed methodology, budget and overall rate). Please mention ‘ICVA impact study’ in the subject of your email.

  • ICVA’s selection process includes rigorous background checks and reflects our organizational integrity and commitment to making humanitarian action more principled and effective.

  • Applications will be considered as submitted. The final deadline for applications is 27 September. Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted.

Klicken Sie hier für weitere Informationen und zu bewerben

Aussendienst-Monteur Lagersysteme, Schaan

 FULL TIME, Informatica, Leyes / Abogados  Comments Off on Aussendienst-Monteur Lagersysteme, Schaan
Aug 312018
 

*8-08-27 Die work-shop Personalmanagement GmbH mit Sitz in Heerbrugg und einer Zweigniederlassung in Schaan (FL) sowie einem Filialnetz von 8 weiteren Niederlassungen steht seit über 23 Jahren als HR-Generalist für Vertrauen und Kundenn… – Administración

Klicken Sie hier für weitere Informationen und zu bewerben

 Posted by at 2:19 am

Switzerland: Consultancy: Private Sector Development Impact Bond pilot, Financial Innovation Lab, Global Philanthropy, PFP

 Compras, FULL TIME, Leyes / Abogados, Marketing  Comments Off on Switzerland: Consultancy: Private Sector Development Impact Bond pilot, Financial Innovation Lab, Global Philanthropy, PFP
Aug 182018
 

Organization: UN Children’s Fund
Country: Switzerland
Closing date: 27 Aug 2018

UNICEF works in some of the world’s toughest places, to reach the world’s most disadvantaged children. To save their lives. To defend their rights. To help them fulfill their potential.

Across 190 countries and territories, we work for every child, everywhere, every day, to build a better world for everyone.

And we never give up.

For every child, hope

UNICEF works for a world in which every child has a fair chance in life. It has helped save more children’s lives than any other humanitarian organization – over 90 million since 1990 – and is the world’s largest provider of ready-to-use therapeutic food, a high-protein paste that can bring a malnourished child back to health within weeks. UNICEF also immunizes nearly 40% of the world’s children and when a natural disaster strikes, is already on the ground and ready to act. UNICEF is funded entirely by the voluntary contributions of individuals, businesses, foundations and governments.

How can you make a difference?

Currently UNICEF is undertaking the exploration of new partnerships and financial vehicles in the area of Financial Innovation. In particular, UNICEF aims to develop and launch its first private sector funded Development Impact Bond. The consultant will facilitate and drive this process working with internal and external partners. In particular, the successful candidate will serve as Project Manager for the exploration, design, and implementation of the UNICEF Private Sector Impact Bond to be launched by 2019. The consultant will be responsible for managing all aspect of the process from design to launch the Development Impact Bond.

Under the guidance of the Financial Innovation Lab Manager within the Global Philanthropy team, and working closely with key National Committees, regional and country offices, Supply Division and other headquarters divisions, the consultant will develop and manage the design and implementation of the first UNICEF Private sector funded Impact Bond in order to maximize results for children. The consultant will also, under direction, support the exploration of other innovative financing and philanthropy mechanisms as suitable.

MAIN TASKS:

Diagnostic and scoping:

  • Project design: define the concept, strategy, prototypes, and implementation plan of UNICEF’s Development Impact bond pilot
  • Identify any UN agencies and /or international NGOs implementing development impact bonds, provide a brief overview and tabulate lessons learned that might be applicable to UNICEF
  • Desk review of existing impact bonds mechanisms around the world to better make informed decisions on modalities for future engagement.
  • Establish a technical committee to provide programme and technical advice and direction
  • Development of prototypes:

  • Through a consultative process, identify the best programmatic priorities for the development impact bond and UNICEF’s role to further mobilize private sector financial resources and maximize results for children.
  • Conduct a feasibility assessment and build up 2-3 preliminary prototypes that can be used to engage partners.
  • Liaise with internal and external partners thought events and other forums to identify investors and outcome funders
  • Develop different communications and marketing materials to be presented for internal approval as well as to potential funders and investors.
  • Support the development of a tailored fundraising strategy to maximize this opportunity.
  • Conduct risk analysis and mitigating mechanisms (both internal and external).
  • Deal construction:

  • Finalize technical design, financial model and contract templates. May involver a pre-launch pilot.
  • Cooperate with UNICEF Finance and legal teams and internal and external partners and stakeholders to create an appropriate financial and legal framework for DIB.
  • Keep up to date with latest political, economic, social and technological developments in the key markets where the Impact Bond will focus on, and develop / adjust strategies and action plans accordingly.
  • Launch & Implementation

  • Define processes and materials among stakeholders for successful execution of project. With on-going performance management and learnings captured.
  • Prepare review reports highlighting mid-term learnings, challenges and future opportunities for action
  • DELIVERABLES:

    Reporting Arrangements:

  • Regular (once/twice-weekly call) with Financial Innovation Lab team at PFP and weekly written update of key actions undertaken in part week and planned for following week.
  • Month 3: initial review report
  • Month 6: mid-term report
  • Month 8: final report
  • To PFP and Young People’s Agenda (YPA) Secretariat in New York.

    Expected result: Launch of UNICEF’s Private Sector Development Impact bond pilot by 2019.

    REPORTING TO:

    The consultant will be under the guidance of the Financial Innovation Lab Manager within the Global Philanthropy team, and working closely with key National Committees, regional and country offices, Supply Division and other headquarters divisions.

    WORK PLACE:

    The consultant will be based in Geneva or come to Geneva at least once a quarter for a period of 3-5 days. Travel may be required. Specific travel plans will be defined as needed.

    ESTIMATED DURATION OF THE CONTRACT AND PROPOSAL:

    8 months (tentatively from September 2018 to April 2019)

    To qualify as an advocate for every child you will have…

  • Advanced university degree in international development, economics, public or business administration or closely related fields required. A first level university degree with a relevant combination of academic qualifications and experience may be accepted in lieu of an advanced university degree.
  • The successful candidate will have at least eight years of professional, relevant and progressively work experience, in Development Finance and/or Innovative Finance and have successfully structured and implemented social, development and/or humanitarian impact bonds.
  • Knowledge of the principles of philanthropy is required, as is an understanding of international development.
  • Relationships with investors, foundations and / or high net worth philanthropists is highly desirable.
  • Experience of working in international organizations, is an additional asset.
  • Knowledge of the UN system is an advantage.
  • Fluency in English is required with excellent writing and presenting skills. Fluency in another UN language is considered an asset.
  • For every Child, you demonstrate…

    UNICEF’s core values of Commitment, Diversity and Integrity.

    Core Values

  • Commitment
  • Diversity and Inclusion
  • Integrity
  • Core Competencies

  • Communication (Level II)
  • Working with People (Level II)
  • Drive for Results (Level II)
  • Functional Competencies

  • Planning and Organizing (Level II)
  • Relating and Networking (Level II)
  • Formulating Strategies and Concepts (Level II)
  • Persuading and Influencing (Level II)
  • Adapting and Responding to Change (Level II)
  • Coping with Pressure and Setbacks (Level II)
  • View our competency framework at http://www.unicef.org/about/employ/files/UNICEF_Competencies.pdf

    UNICEF is committed to diversity and inclusion within its workforce, and encourages all candidates, irrespective of gender, nationality, religious and ethnic backgrounds, including persons living with disabilities, to apply to become a part of the organization.

    Remarks: Please indicate your ability, availability and daily/monthly rate (in US$) to undertake the terms of reference above (including travel and daily subsistence allowance, if applicable). Applications submitted without a daily/monthly rate will not be considered. Also, please mention the earliest date you can start.

    How to apply:

    UNICEF is committed to diversity and inclusion within its workforce, and encourages qualified female and male candidates from all national, religious and ethnic backgrounds, including persons living with disabilities, to apply to become a part of our organization. To apply, click on the following link http://www.unicef.org/about/employ/?job=515517

    Klicken Sie hier für weitere Informationen und zu bewerben

    Switzerland: Consultancy – Child Protection Consultant to develop guidance paper on deinstitutionalization of children with disabilities in Europe and Central Asia, Geneva, Switzerland

     FULL TIME, Informatica, Leyes / Abogados, Quimica, Biologia  Comments Off on Switzerland: Consultancy – Child Protection Consultant to develop guidance paper on deinstitutionalization of children with disabilities in Europe and Central Asia, Geneva, Switzerland
    Aug 142018
     

    Organization: UN Children’s Fund
    Country: Switzerland
    Closing date: 23 Aug 2018

    UNICEF works in some of the world’s toughest places, to reach the world’s most disadvantaged children. To save their lives. To defend their rights. To help them fulfill their potential.

    Across 190 countries and territories, we work for every child, everywhere, every day, to build a better world for everyone.

    And we never give up.

    For every child, Protection

    Background

    Institutional care is widely understood by governments and civil society to be harmful for children. The Convention of the Rights of the Child, the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the UN Guidelines for the Alternative Care of Children all recognise that the ideal setting for a child to grow up in, and for persons with disabilities to fulfil their potential and participate as full citizens, is within a family environment that provides a nurturing and loving atmosphere, or, when necessary, within a community-based care system which is suitable to meet their individual needs. In addition to the human rights case, there is a strong economic case for choosing family- and community-based care over institutions. The cost of providing family- and community-based care is often less expensive and the social return is much higher.

    After decades of evidence-based advocacy and policy dialogue, many governments have led reforms to close or transform large-scale institutions and replace them with community and family based alternative care services and put in place family support services to prevent children from being unnecessarily separated from their families. Throughout the countries in the Europe and Central Asia Region, significant progress has been made in terms of the development of new child and family services, although continued investment and momentum is required to ensure the reforms are irreversible and no child is left behind.

    At the same time, the varying paces at which different services have been developed, and their uneven availability across time and space, have hindered the reforms and sometimes created unintended consequences. There is an increasing concern amongst child care professionals in some of the countries of the region that an emphasis on small group homes (SGHs) may contribute to the re-institutionalization or trans-institutionalization rather than re-integration and inclusion of children. Moreover, within a desired continuum of needed social services, the construction and running of SGHs may be burdensome on the child care budget, taking the lions’ share of it and thus jeopardizing the development of community-based care and preventive services, the latter being the element of the reform which, across the entire region, appears still to be the least well developed. There is also recognition that small-scale, residential care, plays an important (albeit smaller) role in the child protection and child care system. And that in the context of dismantling large scale institutions, there may be a slightly larger role for SGHs in the medium term given the profiles of children who have spent years in harmful large institutional care and may be less inclined to move into family-based care. Furthermore, there are unresolved questions around when a small group home or small residential facility becomes too big, and therefore is no longer appropriate? There is guidance around the characteristics of a small group setting, but the specifics have not been agreed across organizations and stakeholders. This has led to variations in practice, and the possibility that governments and others are not being accurate in their classification of care placements. The continued uncertainty about what constitutes an appropriate small residential facility, and an inappropriate institution, also confuses the data and statistics around the number of children in institutional care in any given country or territory.

    Moreover, there is no professional consensus about children placed in boarding schools and whether these children are in residential/institutional care and should be addressed by the national deinstitutionalization efforts. The dividing line between residential care and boarding schools is blurred. In the Europe and Central Asia l region and in many parts of the world, facilities described as ‘boarding schools’, ‘internats’, ‘hostels’ share many of the characteristics of residential care/even institutional care, and children in such facilities share similar experiences to other children in residential/institutional care. Some children in such facilities may return to communities and families regularly but others may not, leaving them more vulnerable to abuse and to the problems associated with a loss of attachment.

    Attempts to distinguish between boarding schools and residential care are further complicated by the fact that, many children enter residential care to gain an education (usually a special education in the case of children with special educational needs or disabilities) or access to other services, rather than because they are in need of care and protection. The motivations for placing children in residential care should not be considered as the primary factor distinguishing residential/institutional care from boarding schools. Children living in facilities because they lack parental care, or because they have parents willing and able to care for them but lacking access to basic services close to home, can all potentially be in residential care. Consideration of the definition and characteristics of residential care, particularly of degrees of contact with homes and communities, can be used to help determine whether children are in boarding schools or in residential care. The difference between boarding schools and residential care is neatly summarized in the following quote from Tolfree: “Children’s homes (or orphanages) ….are quite different from boarding schools in that they tend to replace parental roles. Boarding schools seek to supplement parental roles and responsibilities: parental responsibility remains intact and children normally return home for the holidays”[1].

    In 2013, UNICEF commissioned an independent evaluation to assess the extent to which child care reforms in eleven countries[2] during the period 2005-2012 had triggered results for children. The evaluation concluded that: Across the countries covered, there has been a noticeable decline in the rate of children in institutional care. The rate of children in residential care has decreased the most in Bulgaria (by 41.5per cent from 2005 to 2012). In Moldova, the number of children living in institutional care was reduced by over 50per cent (over 5,000 children were placed into family based care during the period 2005-2012). In the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, the total number of children in institutional care dropped by 27.6per cent (2005-2012), while the number of foster families increased by 60per cent in the same period (111 to 178). The reform of child care systems in EU new member states (Bulgaria, Croatia and Romania) showed significant progress in creating a comprehensive legal framework aimed to contribute to the improvement of the quality of care.

    While de-institutionalization has been (and will continue to be in many countries) the entry point for reforming the child care system, it is not an end goal in and of itself. The process of de-institutionalization leads to diversified family-based alternative care services at community level, and to the further development of family support services. These services need to be maintained, improved and expanded in response to the needs of communities and families. Ensuring quality interventions requires setting standards, ensuring monitoring and support, and sustaining and expanding national budgets for these services.

    “Though governments increasingly recognise the inevitability of deinstitutionalization, there is less clarity with regard to the mechanisms that replace institutionalization and what would constitute a human rights-based response.” [3] This led to the development of The Common European Guidelines on the Transition from Institutional to Community-based Care[4], commonly referred to as the “Common European Guidelines” which brought together European and international best practices to “provide practical advice about how to make a sustained transition from institutional care to family-based and community-based alternatives.”

    Since the UN CRPD, a paradigm shift is occurring away from a medical model of care, towards a social rights model where individuals are supported to become active citizens making a contribution to their own communities. This has been accompanied by a wider understanding of the adaptations which society must make in order to ensure that the rights of people with disabilities are vindicated:[5] a re-shaping of how services are provided, the development of new services not currently available to meet new and changing needs and/or the integration in the services of a person centred, inclusive, participative and individualised approach, adopting the new social rights model of disability. This paradigm shift therefore requires a movement. One of the areas requiring improvements and/or changes is the way provision of long term and/or intense care is provided to children with disabilities.

    The Common European Guidelines[6] see it as imperative that in managing the transition process people with significant disabilities and complex needs are not left behind as this only generates additional needs. Promoting a person-centred approach will inevitably require services to develop innovative solutions, providing greater choice and control throughout life.

    Regarding community based services, the guidelines refer to the spectrum of services that enable individuals to live in the community and, in the case of children, to grow up in a family environment as opposed to an institution. It encompasses mainstream services, such as housing, healthcare, education, employment, culture and leisure, which should be accessible to everyone regardless of the nature of their impairment or the required level of support. It also refers to specialised services, such as personal assistance for persons with disabilities, respite care and others. In addition, the term includes family-based and family-like care for children, including substitute family care and preventative measures for early intervention and family support.

    For UNICEF, the issue of child protection, including de-institutionalization and child care reform, is closely linked to broader social protection reform. Linkages between the two areas have been and will continue to be essential to successfully support governments in larger reform efforts that have an impact on child care.

    There is some consensus that deinstitutionalization becomes a better prospect when some of the building blocks of the child welfare system are already in place. Deinstitutionalization is easier to plan and implement if there is a single ministry in control of the process and if all the institutions are under one ministry. There must be technical capacity at central government level to plan, but also to make policy, collect information to monitor and evaluate. When government makes funds available for deinstitutionalization it is an expression of concrete commitment. The government working together with donors such as the EU on deinstitutionalization adds further political weight to the process. It is necessary to have systems in place that prevent other entities from filling the perceived residential care gap and building residential care facilities or small group homes that are outside the public care system.

    The reforms, although moving well, require continued investment and momentum to ensure no child is left behind. Frequently deinstitutionalization and child care reform plans have not prioritised the most vulnerable within the system of institutional care namely the children under three years of age and children with disabilities. Few children with disabilities are being fostered or locally adopted.

    Evidence and data show that children with disabilities have benefited the least from these reforms. A child with a disability in the region is almost 17 times more likely to be institutionalized than a child without a disability. As a result, approximately half of all children living in public institutional care in the region are children with disabilities – in some countries it is as high as 70 per cent. There are other countries in the region where progress has been slow overall, with little political will of governments to start important child care reforms.

    The region can be largely divided into three categories: 1) countries that have made significant progress, and require a final push to transform and close the remaining large institutions, ensure that the proliferation of unregulated orphanages is prevented, and accelerate the quality and availability of the relatively new family support services and diversified alterative care system; 2) countries that have demonstrated the political will to reform the child care system, but are still in the middle of the de-institutionalization reform stage and require intensive technical and financial support to continue towards a diverse, family-based care system; 3) countries that are at the early stages of child care reform, still have a number of large institutions for children, and require support to generate political will and new services to tackle the problem.

    It is important to mention that children with disabilities represent unfinished DI business for all country groups. Many countries of the ECA region face big challenges in planning and implementing DI plans for children with disabilities, lacking knowledge and expertise in meeting the needs of children with disabilities and their families outside institutional care, as well as international evidence and guidance, capacities and resources.

    The challenges for children with disabilities are primarily social and cultural. The support services should be directed towards the ability and potential of these children, as well as their relationship with the environment, and not on the disability. There is a rights and economic imperative to ensure that there is equal access to all services and that these are designed to meet the needs of children with disabilities. If there is discrimination and inadequate support for helping children with disabilities grow and learn to live independently, they will continue to need the support of the state into adulthood.[7]

    In all contexts, social norms around institutional care, especially for children with disabilities, are of particular importance. Closing institutions for children with disabilities and establishing high quality family- and community-based care and preventive services requires a multi-sectoral approach across health, education and social welfare – as well as intensive efforts at community level to overcome the stigma and discrimination associated with disability.

    The UNICEF ECA Regional Office provides a comprehensive partnership and policy framework as well as technical support functions to these reforms. Child care reform is a priority area for UNICEF across the region. The Regional Office has and will continue to lead the development of solutions and strategies for child care reform. Partnerships at the regional and global level are also particularly important. The EU’s groundbreaking Ex-Ante Conditions associated with Institutional Care, for example, were successfully advocated for in close collaboration with the European Expert Group in Brussels nearly ten years ago. In 2020 these conditionalities, which prohibit the use of EU structural funds for institutional care, will be up for review. In close partnership with Oak Foundation, UNICEF is working to ensure that policy makers in the EU are aware of the importance of these conditions, and pledge to strengthen and extend them into the next EU budgeting framework post 2020.

    How can you make a difference?

    Purpose of the assignment

    Under the supervision of the Regional Advisor Child Protection, and in close collaboration with other child protection consultants and the focal point for disability, the consultant will provide technical support to UNICEF Europe and Central Asia Regional Office in developing a technical guidance paper on deinstitutionalization of children with disabilities. In doing so, the consultant will also look into all types of institutions caring for children with disabilities, including boarding schools (special schools) and small group homes (small residential care settings).

    The paper intends to accomplish the following:

  • Promote better decision-making among policy makers and child welfare professionals in the region regarding deinstitutionalization of children with disabilities, by examining the institutions caring for these children, including boarding schools and small group homes, as well as family-based alternatives, community support systems and services and mainstream universal services.
  • Establish, based on an extensive review of evidence and common practices, concrete definitions (main characteristics) of what constitutes an acceptable form of small group home (or small residential care setting) and boarding school (or “internats”) in their roles in the transition from institutional to community-based care and in an established child care system.
  • Outline effective evidence-based strategies to promote appropriate deinstitutionalization of children with disabilities, including increasing political will for the development of a balanced child care system to cover for different needs of children, catalysing preventative work to reduce overall numbers in the child care system, and promoting family-based alternatives for the clear majority of children in the care system.
  • Main tasks

    The main tasks of the assignment are as follows:

  • Guidance on child care reform (De-I) and children with disability
  • Develop the methodology (approaches, methods and tools) for the development of the disability and child care reform guidance document.
  • Undertake a desk review of the issue.
  • Undertake primary and secondary data collection as required.
  • Work with a broad number of partners to collectively develop the paper on DI of children with disabilities. These include the members of the reference group and other internal and external stakeholders.
  • Draft the guidance paper.
  • Reach the consensus with the reference group, widely consult and validate the paper.
  • Contribute to the drafting of the small group home white paper under development by ECARO
  • Provide specific research support to the development of the white paper (by channelling relevant research from the guidance note into the white paper)
  • Review and input into the first draft of the white paper
  • Attend meetings of the reference group as a technical resource as required
  • Outputs/Deliverables

  • Guidance paper on child care reform (De-I) and Children with Disability
  • Research methodology (5 days)

    Desk review and report (5 days)

    Research and data collection and analysis (20 days)

    Guidance paper drafted and validated (10 days)

  • White paper on small group homes
  • Compile relevant research from Output A that can feed into the white paper (2 days)
  • Review and contribute to draft document (2 days)
  • Participate in reference group consultation (2 days)
  • Estimated Duration of the Contract

    15 September – 15 December 2018.

    Consultant’s Work Place and Official Travel

    The CP specialist will work from home. He/she may be asked to travel to the ECA Regional Office in Geneva Switzerland or/and countries of the region.

    Estimated Cost of the Consultancy & Payment Schedule

    Payment will be made at the end of each month, based on the above-mentioned deliverables.

    To qualify as an advocate for every child you will have…

  • Advanced university degree in sociology, social work (preferred) or another relevant field
  • Minimum 10 years of progressively responsible professional work experience in child protection, and in particular child care reform, at the national or international levels
  • Expert knowledge of child care reform, including relevant instruments and guidance
  • Knowledge of the ECA region an asset
  • Excellent analytical and written skills
  • Fluency in English (oral and written). Knowledge of another UN language is an asset.
  • For every Child, you demonstrate…

    UNICEF’s core values of Commitment, Diversity and Integrity and core competencies in Communication, Working with People and Drive for Results.

    [1] Tolfree 1995, p.42

    [2] Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bulgaria, Croatia, Georgia, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, Turkey and Ukraine.

    [3] COE Human Rights Commissioner, 2012.

    [4] https://deinstitutionalisation.com/eeg-publications Common European Guidelines on the Transition from Institutional to Community-based Care, published in November 2012

    [5] EASPD MAKING COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICES A REALITY – Roadmap on deinstitutionalization

    [6] https://deinstitutionalisation.com/eeg-publication Common European Guidelines on the Transition from Institutional to Community-based Care, published in November 2012

    [7]Every Child and Better Care Network: Enabling reform – Why supporting children with disabilities must be at the heart of successful child care reform

    UNICEF is committed to diversity and inclusion within its workforce, and encourages all candidates, irrespective of gender, nationality, religious and ethnic backgrounds, including persons living with disabilities, to apply to become a part of the organization.

    Remarks:

    Please include a full CV and Financial Proposal in your application. Additionally, indicate your availability and monthly rate (in US$) to undertake the terms of reference above. Applications submitted without a monthly rate will not be considered.Only shortlisted candidates will be contacted and advance to the next stage of the selection process.

    How to apply:

    UNICEF is committed to diversity and inclusion within its workforce, and encourages qualified female and male candidates from all national, religious and ethnic backgrounds, including persons living with disabilities, to apply to become a part of our organization. To apply, click on the following link http://www.unicef.org/about/employ/?job=515362

    Klicken Sie hier für weitere Informationen und zu bewerben

    Sachbearbeiter Fachrichtung Sanitär/Heizung/Lüftung, Illnau

     FULL TIME, Leyes / Abogados  Comments Off on Sachbearbeiter Fachrichtung Sanitär/Heizung/Lüftung, Illnau
    Aug 042018
     

    Ort: Illnau, Zürich Jobtyp: Festanstellung Publikationsdatum: Freitag, 27. Juli*8 Referenznummer: **-1 Stellenbeschreibung Du interessierst dich für den Lebenszyklus einer Immobilie und stehst gerne im Kontakt mit v…
    Randstad

    Klicken Sie hier für weitere Informationen und zu bewerben

     Posted by at 4:23 am

    Für Freelancer: Business Analyst in St. Gallen gesucht 50%, St. Gallen

     FULL TIME, Leyes / Abogados  Comments Off on Für Freelancer: Business Analyst in St. Gallen gesucht 50%, St. Gallen
    Aug 042018
     

    Freelancer Projekt – Referenznummer:**SSTOrt:St. Gallen und RegionVertragsart:ContractPublikationsdatum:27/07/*8 Business Analyst in St. Gallen gesucht 50% Rolle: Ziel des Projekts ist es eine alte Umgehungslösung abzubauen, so d…

    Klicken Sie hier für weitere Informationen und zu bewerben

     Posted by at 3:19 am